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gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine for the very first time in her life. even grandma was invited to see the machine. throughout her life, she had been heating water with fire hood and hand wash laundry for her seven children and sat down in front of the machine and she watched the entire washing program. to my grandmother, the washing machine was a miracle. >> but there are seven billion people on work and most have no access to such miracles. >> two billion have access and the remaining five billion, how do they wash? they wash like this: by hand. it is a time consuming labor which they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine. they don't want to spend such a large part of their life doing this hard work with so relatively low productivity. but when i electric truer to environmentally concerned students they say everyone in the can world cannot have cars and washing machine. how can we tell th
but this gentleman has caught the world's attention because he gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine r the very first time in her life. even grandma was invited to see the machine. throughout her life, she had been heating water with fire hood and hand wash laundry for her seven children and sat down in front of the machine and she watched the entire washing program. to my grandmother, the washing machine was a miracle. >> but there are seven billion people on work and most have no access to such miracles. >> two billion have access and the remaining five billion, how do they wash? they wash like this: by hand. it is a time consuming labor which they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine. they don't want to spend such a large part of their life doing this hard work wit so relatively low productivity. but when i electric truer to environmentally concerned students they say everyone in the can world cannot ha
on theyu would put you to sleep but he has caught the roads attention because he gave a talk to technology entertainment decide more than 100,000 times here is part of it. >> when i saw my mother and though the washing machine for the first time in her life. >> even grandma was invited to see the machine. she had hand washed laundry for seven children and she sat down in front of the ch she watched the entire program and was mesmerized to my grandmother>> b the washing machine was a are >> there 7 billion people and most have no access to the miracle. hav >> 2 billion have access but the remainnng 5 billion how do they wash? like this. by hand. it is a hard time consuming labor that they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine that what the large part of their life doing this hard part with low productivity. but environmentally concerned students say that everybody can have them. how to retell this woman she cannot? >> students don't want them to? >> they are concerned aboutngou how many of you had to wash your genes? no one. s one time there was one boy. but there w
, united states is pushing forward with technology and the market economy and they ve a lot of good public health things beg done and the rest of the world that is dominateing, india and china, but in the 60's they ssed the market economies are good and they grow their economies and they are catching up. todaen we land, 2010, tse are the countries that borro money theichest when they have their problems. >> in my mind this raises two questions, or two amazing results from this. there have been thousands of years of human history and everyone was stuck on the lower left for thousands of years, it has been 200 years that you have all of this activity and how comeome countries are still stuck? >> it is easy to understand. the best message today is that most of thefrican countries are now in fast economic growth. they have correctedthe wrong market ideas they had 20 years ago, and they have a much better education than, -- and tanzania is similar to thailand in 1972 and soon we will see african countries doing good. >> this is wonderful. our problems are solved w know wh works and we will be
are the big challenges year, what are the things different now? from a technology perspective, this is pretty easy. i can tell you that if we were to do this today, you would say, i cannot believe you were using lte phones and 4g, as i am using 6g. joining us is a director for cisco systems business solution group, which is a global strategy and consulting arm. prior to that, he was president and ceo of government's strategy is of a leading market research firm from 2001 to 2003 heading the industry advisory council, a founding member of a council, and he spent 28 years in the federal government, including being the first cio at the department of commerce, and he is also a winner. doug bourgeois is the chief for vmware. prior to that, he was the director of national business center at interior, where he provided business management services government wide like the ones we talked about he had several roles at fedex. he has also hosted the vmware's i.t. challenge. it airs in the washington, d.c., market. mark forman is the first official c.i.o., president and co-founder of government transacti
:an exploration of reverse engineering of the brain. the national medal of technology recipient attempts to determine how the brain works and apply the knowledge to the creation of intelligent michelin's. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,achines . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, ingrid wickelgren. >> this is a fascinating book and it is great to be with you. my first question is to try to talk about the main thesis of the book. are you saying that we can basically reverse engineer the human brain, that it is feasible to do that to creates computer mind that is in distinguishable from yours and mine? >> it is feasible. the level of complexity we can handle, i actually describe the basic principles of the neocortex in the book. some people say and i articulate this criticism in the book and respond to it that every one of the hundreds of trillions of connections was placed exactly
that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our technology leaders, the people who really inspired me, they were inspired by these wonderful things happening. i'm going to focus on a little period of time. as short as four years, maybe six or seven. it is that time that orville wright and his brother took off. the world realized -- they did not do that with photoshop. since that first flight, the people who had taken a flight could sit in that first wrote and only three of you would have taken a turn. we did not even have the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the move
this was not impersonal market forces, this was not technology, this was not globalization. what was happening was american politics and american economics were working against the middle class. people did this. we decided this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wo
into the early 21st century, the confidence has given way to doubt. technologically newer forms of travel especially airplanes and rocket-propelled capsules provide the sense of extreme danger that had faded during the relatively safer nineteentnineteent h century. equally, it's now clear that imperialism had smoothed the way from early circumnavigate is under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust to perpetuate let alone re-create. above all there is a growing sense of the planet as beginning to fight back or shrug us off. that that was environment the cost of planetary dominatiodominatio n that had begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel, every emerging fear that the planet could simply shrugged this off, continuing confidence if we might be able to generate technology and political alliances to dominate the planet but doubt that it is always wise to dominate it in that way. is especially apparent that the characteristic confidence of the long 19th century was the shortest of planetary experiences. yet it has been the most d
with the brand new electronics you just unwrapped. our technology editor is here with how to get the best use out of all that gear. >> knowing me, when i open one of those, i'm the first to scratch it, drop it, break it. >>> first, we want to get to some of this news. major damage after strong storms swept through the gulf states. at least three people have died, dozens more are injured from texas to georgia. >> and the news could be getting worse. that storm is moving east with strong winds and snow. winter watches and warnings are posted in 21 states, from texas all the way to maine, including blizzard warnings in seven of those states. our coverage begins with abc's brad wheelis. >> oh, my god, look, that's a tornado. >> reporter: this twister slammed into downtown mobile, alabama, injuring several people. vast swaths of this city were suddenly dark, leaving 17,000 homes and businesses without power. emergency crews blocked roads to better assess the damage, while the rain continued to pour on the city. >> oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> reporter: another of the more than a dozen tornadoes
be watching and maybe putting money up against? here to tell us is technology reporter natalie morris. welcome back. you had a little baby since the last time, ava. congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> nice christmas, i'm sure. let's start with what you see as a possibility in the phone space next year. >> okay. so i'm seeing a lot of rumors about something called branded phones. so facebook, amazon, now google, mozilla, having whisperings about their own phone which may be a little confusing for consumers but these are phones that are highly branded with these services and that you will be able to get to the services anywhere you are. you can facebook anything -- >> instead of motorola, i will have a private label amazon phone that's going to help me get to amazon and its services quickly, facebook and its quickly. but will they run on droid or microsoft's platform? >> that's the question. there are rumors that mozilla will do their own operating system but a lot of these will probably use some version of android. >> let's talk about microsoft which is always in the news. the surface,
's, essentially, a technology of last resort for the internet. you use it if there is no possibility of direct physical can connections. and there are, you know, fewer and fewer places in the world, fewer and fewer countries that do not now have redundant physical connections. that's, you know, most remarkably that's africa. the last two or three years now have seen b six new cables where previously there was only one. so as much as possible people are eager to move away from satellite not only because of the high cost and the relatively low bandwidth, but because of what's known as the latency, the actual time delay in making that 30,000-mile trip to space and back. >> host: so, mr. blum, these centers, 60 hudson avenue, london, etc., ashburn, virginia, are these when it comes to cybersecurity, would these be prime targets? >> guest: no. i don't think they would be. i mean, i take cybersecurity very seriously, but i think the far greater concern is the threat through the networks, not the threat to the physical infrastructure itself. these are buildings that are relatively well secured. they'
, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological innovation. there has to be a greater appreciation for the role of science and technology in society. we have to get young women engaged early. we found that if young women are engaged in experiments to work, if they are part of the team, it makes a big difference. we try to create an intergene rational mentoring system. when young women come through the ranks through the promotion and tenure process, we have to ensure fairness of the system. it is a complex problem. that is why it is hard for people to talk about it. >> why is it important that there are more women? >> it is important that there be more science. we are about to face what i call the quiet crisis. you have a number of scientists in this country who came of age when i did. they are beginning to retire. those retirements are going to accelerate over the next few years. the second hidden variable is that we depend strongly on immigrants. we have always been a nation of immigrants. i do not think people appreciate how much of our science and engineering work force is made
technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacan do for you. lyric from phonak. life is on. david: good morning varney & company viewers. i'm david asman. stuart will be back tomorrow. new at 10:00, federal subsidies for wind power are set to expire in a couple of days on december 31st if congress decides to extend those subsidies, you the taxpayer will be on the hook for 12 billion dollars just for next year alone. since 92 the u.s. has spent nearly 24 billion dollars on wind energy, but get this, it hasn't gotten any cheaper, not a penny. it is still one of the most expensive ways to get energy. so we will be discussing that. let's check the big board. we're up 27, 27, 28 points. again, it reached a high of up 35 points on the dow, a little earlier this morning. it pulled back from that and then is going modestly upward as well. we're not expecting big volume today, but we have big topics to talk about with our company: elizabeth macdonald, adam shapiro
. [applause] how would i advise a president who is not interested in nasa doing better technologies and doing exploration like it did in the 1960's? is that a better question? i was telling him that the public's has an expectation for this $18 billion, that you spend a large percentage of it, maybe even a large majority of it, on pure research. in other words, i want you to take my tax payer money and go out and try to do something that you may not be able to do. in fact, i call it research only if half the people think is impossible. if most of the people think it is possible, then you are doing development. you are not a research organization. if you took anybody out of nasa, out of engineering, i don't care if they were head of nasa or a secretary or a shop guy, when jfk got up and said 21 days after alan shepard made this little flight, that we are going to go to the moon before 1970, everybody jumped up and down. you know why? multi-year funding. wow, we are going to have jobs for nine years. yes, we can do it. this is cool. we will beat the russians. everybody was real excited. grab any
. >> what we're trying to do is to encourage the chinese to promote all kinds of clean technology. we've had an office in beijing since 1995 and 30, 35 people there, we have good contacts in the government. good contacts in the business community and we're making a difference there, but what it's about, is helping the chinese to improve their efficiency. david, their industrial efficiency is improved by two-thirds since 1980, but they're still 15 to 20% behind where they need to be. they are he going to get there in the next-- >> let's be realistic, you're comparing natural gas and wind mills, it's going to be a long time before wind mills can get to where natural gas is. if we have to deal with a solution right now for the chinese to prevent them from spewing out all of that coal. 70% of their energy needs is coal-produced. if we want to switch to something cle something cleaner. natural gas in the meantime. >> what china is doing, what no one in the history has done, hundreds of millions of people from abject poverty to the middle class. it's energy and effort unfortunately #70% is coal. a
to support a growing population. we have not develop the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve their as problems -- to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we
the slaughter in syria. earlier he talked about the need for god in a technology-driven world. and crowds packed manger square in bethlehem. >>> authorities in western new york still don't know why an ex-con set fire to his house and then shot firefighters as they arrived two died in the ambush and two others were wounded. jim axelrod reports. >> reporter: as the four firemen arrived to fight the fire, they were met with gunshots. >> we are being shot at. multiple firemen shot. i am shot. >> reporter: two of the men died instantly. two were wounded. >> be advised i'm snuck the lower leg, the knee area and the lower left back. >> reporter: the gunshots prevented the first responders from putting out the fire. seven homes were consumed by the flames. >> it is still an active investigation, but at first blush it appears that it was a trap. >> reporter: the webster police chief said that william spengler likely set the fire intentionally and waited to ambush the first responders. spengler spent 17 years in prison for beating his grandmother to death with a hammer in 1980. w
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
, as will an app on the android devices. no word on which technology santa himself will be using. >>> now to our video and we picked this one solely because it's certainly cute. this is a baby panda getting a check-up at the san diego zoo. i could watch this for hours, but we only have a few seconds. enjoy it while it lasts. the panda's name, xiao liwu, means "little gift" in mandarin. that green ball right there is his favorite toy. his handlers use it to test the animal's coordination. we want to hear from you. if something catches your eye, hit me on twitter at danbharris. >>> coming up, what to buy for the person who has everything. how about this? a jet pack, $100,000. can restore testosterone levels back to normal in mo axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your d
technology. they find a myriad of ways to apply it. when they began to apply it, they have to collaborate. at that point it will start to organize itself in ways we cannot imagine. do ise're trying to engineer the world -- a world movement. >> if i can ask you to keep it brief so we can maybe take another one. >> you mentioned that some of these movements have fizzled out. the biggest crisis is climate change. what do you think social movements can do to turn this around and make corporations and governments take action? >> i have been working with 350.org and [inaudible] if youy have -- if you have not checked it out, 350.or. -- org. as we have seen with the last election, the discussion was not about the numbers, it was about the emotional logic. hob it cannot argue with the storm. it will comments masher house. even if you are ann coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help
with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. neural speeds increasing to 4g lte. brain upgrading to a quad-core processor. predictive intelligence with google now complete. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. >> harris: we are hearing from a police officer who survived the shooting that killed two volunteer firefighters. he says he never saw the gunman pull the trigger but he could clearly hear the gunshots. it all happened on christmas eve in upstate, new york. the shooter likely set that fire as a trap and just waited for first responders to arrive. here is how the off duty officer described the scene. >> i come around that corner seconds after the fire department gets there. in my assumption i don't have a sense of anything other than a round or something incident sckets my windshield and i heard multiple shots after that. at that point i determined someone is shooting. >> harris: manual oman. flying shrapnel wounded that officer is
, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. >> good morning to you. we are 19 minutes past the hour. we are down to the wire. it's the final day to run out and get the last minute christmas gifts. a lot of stores staying open all night long to help you check off your names on the list. antoine lewis is here in new york city. he joins us now with more. how are you doing today? >> heather, immigrate. how are you? >> what do you have out there? >> well, a lot of people making their way into this macy's in harold square. they have been open continuously through out the holiday. they are closing their door christmas ooe today at 6:00 in the evening one of many stores doing the same thicng. that has been the trend for the number of people who wait until the last minute. there's interesting information associated with this particular holiday. normally black friday is the busiest shopping day of the year. after that the saturday before christmas. financial analysts say this year it doesn't
ruining the season as kids get more accustomed to technology? >> microsoft windows 8 gets more bad press today, as "the new york times" said it is not leading to a boost in pc sales. is there anything that can turn that lagging sector around? futures moving lower, as concerns about the fiscal cliff talks weigh on the market. talks about progress toward a deal sent the down lower by almost 521 points on friday. s&p up almost 14% on the year. it's interesting, this year we've had so many unnatural phenomenon taking place, whether it's the effects of the fed's monetary policy, year end, fiscal cliff tax related issues. the motivations are a little bit different this time around than they were last year. >> yeah. it's not as pressing, some would argue. some were actually saying on friday, maybe it would have been better if the markets had a sharper sell-off because that could have forced the lawmakers to do something as opposed to leave for obama to have a hastily called friday evening press conference saying, you know what, congress, you have ten days, you go work it out. it's doable. >> it
a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. ♪ get to sears,after christmas mattress spectacular get 36 month special financing. and save up to 60%, plus get an extra 10% off. and free delivery. this is eye opening. this is sears >>> give me the rope from under the seat. >> take a look at this dramatic chain reaction, ice rescue in the mountains of california. one by one, he's sledders plunging into the icy waters. and the whole thing was caught on tape. coming up, how all these people were saved in a matter of moments. 12 people falling into the ice. horrifying video. >> incredible video. we'll show you the rescue in a few minutes. good morning, america. i'm dan harris, alongside bianna golodryga on this saturday, december 29th. >>> rarely has britney spears, she of the shaved head, and trips to rehab, rarely has she been accused of being boring. but that's reportedly what simon cowell is saying as a judge on his show. is she about to get the ax? >> t
with natural gas. and now we have the technology to get it out. but critics argue that it's energy with a very steep price. >> i don't believe that fracking will ever be safe. >> reporter: later on sunday morning, the promise and the perils of fracking. >> osgood: jamie foxx has to be one of the most talented people in american show business. you name it. he does it. byron pitts will get him to show you. >> jamie foxx has made it all the way from the little town of texas to the pinnacle of hollywood. ♪ she knows how to... >> my book will be called "i still pinch myself." >> reporter: he's funny. he can sing. he's an oscar winner. you'll see him later. ♪ ahead on sunday morning >> osgood: as the year 2012 comes to a close this morning, we continue our holiday tradition here at sunday morning. we take time out to remember some of the remarkable people who have left us in the year just pending. >> 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,. ♪ take a load off... >> osgood: they made our hearts sing. they made our spirits soar. >> that's one small step for man. >> osgood: some saved lives, some gave their
been enabled by new technology, in the academic realm, the rise of open access models which need to be embraced rather than in impeded especially since they offer a potential solution to the cost problems in the library sector that tom describes which would not necessarily in this on the economic interests of anyone so we need to think very seriously about how we treat voluntary authorship. by the same token the question remains as to whether or not the account of the ecosystem. i love that terminology, that we have heard today, is in fact the constitutionally correct account. i think i must differ slightly from the account that says the original intent of the framers of the constitution who then turned around the year after and enacted the first copyright act was to give something in balance to all of the participants in the system. as far as i can tell, rightly or wrongly those framers had an instrumental vision of copyright which in fact the end user, the consumer, i am happy to say it again, the reader was the ultimate beneficiary of the system and we may dislike that origina
. >> reporter: in the end, the combination of mom's motivation to find deals and the kids' savvy with technology may be the best combination finding sales. in the end, mom, martha, crushed the teens. she got hundreds off, where they got small dollars off. but i think this just comes down to a motivation issue. they got distracted. they were using their phones to facebook what they bought. yeah. mom, she wanted that deal and she found it. >> she got it. i love this. i didn't know much about this at all. now, i learned a lot, becky. i really did. >> a lot of takeaway. >> a lot of takeaway from that. >> thank you, becky. >> pleasure. >> all right. amy? >>> speaking of deals, 2013 is almost here. we have four perfect looks to ring in the new year in style. "lucky" magazine's lori bergamotto is here. $100 or less. >> there's still bargains to be had, amy. >> we begin with mary. mary's going to come on out. >> this dress is more of a vintage look. you see the tea length. very trendy for right now. we gave her a little thrift store clutch for $5. >> $5? >> go to thrift stores. and shoes from forever 21
celebrate a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. [ cheers and applause ] ♪ like the mistletoe >>> a festive holiday crowd here this times square, albeit a chilly one as well. we bid you all a good morning, america. george and robin enjoying the family today on this holiday. great to have amy robach and paula faris with us. >> thank you so much. >>> and this morning, the wheel of misfortune, losing out on thousands of dollars for how she pronounced one word. fair or unfair? i know what we all think here. wait until you hear it. it's fairly outrageous for those of us who have lived down south for a bit. >> unfair. >> unfair. >> you do. absolutely. >>> this is not unfair at all. this is going to help a lot of us. let's face it. we're down to the wire, people. it is -- everyone here is in trouble except me, which, i know, sam, doesn't surprise you. i'm wrapped and ready. >> you're wrapped and color-coded. >> you're wrapped? everything? >> who spends
brush movements than manual brushes and even up to 50% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. >>> i'll tell you about an incredible use for fish oil. the extent to which surprised me. every year, about 1.7 million people in the united states suffer traumatic brain injuries. i see it every day in my line of work, in severe cases, i can tell you there is no drug, no pill, really no intervention that can truly help once that damage has set in. what are you about to see, though, is two dramatic cases of crippling brain damage that may have, in fact, been reversed biomega 3 fatty acids. the first case, a 17-year-old in a horrible car accident. his car was overturned, he was discovered almost dead. we pick up the story at the hospital, right after that accident. this was the scene. when his parents finally arrived to bobby's bedside. >> you realize that he could be going any time. >> there had been so much bleeding within the brain. his skull could not contain the swelling. every part of his brain was
that technology on our phone today. >> but someone said earlier, this country is broke. he can can't decide whether to cut the biggest drivers, which is medicaid, medicare and social security. >> i'm thinking, i would love to see the president use the word airline or aviation in the state of the union. just to talk about an enabler of the economy. when a plane arrives in rochester, minnesota, new york, savannah, georgia wlab that does is huge. let alone seattle and los angeles. so let's optimize investment to enable transportation and infrastructure. there are companies around the world. this is a national policy and can you see what is happening. >> we need an oil policy and we don't have an energy policy either. >> that's true. >> energy and cost of labor, have those two assisted up for jetblue. >> it is right about 70%. and we have the youngest fleet and we are a young airline relative to labor cost. right about 70%. >> that's a big number. >> it is a big number. >> you've been expanding. i want to ask you about expanding routes. you are adding seattle to anchorage. international, lighro
and i have not heard from him yet this morning. given the fact that he is technologically illiterate, does not use a computer except through us and barely knows how to make a phone call from his cell phone, i guess it's a safe bet this is an imposter. the writing style is not at all like his. when he checks in i will confirm he has not had an unexpected technic technological octo-arian epiphany. thank you for confirming that news. >> whoever it was was such a lowlife he tried to answer you when you posed a question whether it was julian? >> is there a way to find someone who does this? >> i think so. you can try to move the market this way and a lot of real problems with this. >> scum. >> hopefully it's not julian, then i wouldn't be saying that. >> countdown on the fiscal cliff, jim himes, and the political strategy of debt negotiations from analysts from both parties. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register yo
the board. technology high as well, with apple leading the charge up by 2.8%. a lot of interesting moves below the surface in the markets. let's head down to john harwood in d.c. with the very latest. john? >> melissa, we're hearing signs of optimism about a potential deal. somewhere with an income tax threshold in the $400,000 to $500,000 range, not the $250,000 that president obama had been insisting on. although a source familiar with the talks told me a few minutes ago, if it goes between 400 and 500, democrats would get the full increase to 39.6. that is the clinton era rate, extension of unemployment benefits and increase in the estate tax. still the signs are that something is going to happen. in fact, bob corker, the senator from tennessee, was on with joe and i here from washington on "squawk box" and said there will be a deal, even if one that doesn't solve all of our long-term debt and deficit problems. here's bob corker. >> i do think there's going to be a resolve to this. the problem is, you know, we created this fiscal cliff to make some tough decisions. and none are going
. >> everything lives forever in technology. it does. >> it doesn't. >> it will be interesting to see on the next reading on users if users come back, because instagram denounced what they're going to do with the photos. >> it's amazing how one lawyer, one draft had such a big affect. >> exactly. >>> markets are set to decline sharply at the open. how do you prepare for today's session? we'll get the word from the street, that is next. and jim paulson tells us why he's expecting a 15 to 20% gain for the s&p 500 in 2013. looks like we're going to lose 10.5 on the s&p right at the open. more "squawk on the street," right ahead. p for an idea. a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like liberty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people
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carried out a missile launch using ballistic missile technology in correct defiance of the international community this important resolution condemns their launch, calls on the north korea to live up to its commitments, admere to its international obligations and deal piecefully with its neighbors. this is a blatant violation of the u.n. security council resolutions. 1718 and 1874. we urge the security council to take strong and concerted action to demonstrate that pyongyang's actions are completely unacceptable. in familiar -- in particular we call on china and russia to work construct ily with other members of the council to show that the international community is united in condemning north korea's provocative behavior. north korea is only further isolating itself with its irresponsible action and the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons will never bring the real security and acceptance by the international community that the regime so desperately wants. instead of pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into its so-called space program, nuclear programs, and massive
, they're not going to be updating a lot of the technology that helps flights take off and land in a safe manner so you could see some problems there with delayed flights and scaled back schedules, tsa, longer lines. >> what you're talking about is not necessarily just an economic issue, it becomes a safety issue at that point. >> it does, there are a lot of these cuts that could in the end impact consumer safety. >> how about retailers as we're thinking about what happens for the rest of the year and sales and inventory sitting sitting around because consumer ss have pulled back. >> shoppers didn't spend as much as they were going to and that leads them with inventory going in, if people their confidence is down, they're not spending in the same way that they were we could see a lot more discounts, a lot more broad sales that are out there, but of course if you don't feel like you're making a lot of money, then any sale is not going to be a good enough sale. >> kelli grant, thank you very much. >>> more american jobs than ever >>> more american jobs than eve
of the technology that helps flights take off and land in the same manner. you could see problems with delayed flights, delayed scheduled. tsa, longer lines. we all love that anyway. >> what you're talking about is not necessarily an economic issue. it becomes a safety issue at that point. >> it does. there are actually a lot of these cuts that could in the end affect consumer safety. >> how about retailers as we're thinking about what happens for the rest of the year and sales and inventory sitting around because consumers have put wbac? >> we saw that already. they didn't spend as much as the retailers thought they were going to and that's going to lead to more inventory in the new year. we could see a lot more discounts. of course, if you don't feel like you're making a lot of money, any money is not going to be a good enough sail. >> >>> more american jobs than ever depend on investment from china. we're going to go to california this morning where the chinese are finding bargains they can't pass up on "cbs this morning." "this is george. he is a good little monkey and always very curious.
's sale. help protect your family with the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 -- a savings of $300 plus 15% off accessories. but you must call before midnight january 2nd. more than a security system, adt can help let your family in from the cold even when you're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more important than money. call now to save $300 on adt starting at $99 installed plus 15% off accessories. sale ends midnight january 2nd. >> rick: time for your shot of the morning. a husky that went missing nine months ago in phoenix finally reunited with its owner. a woman found contain more than 1,000 miles away in oregon running near a busy highway. a local humane society tracked down cane's owner by using his identity chip. that is a nice christmas gift if you get your pooch
of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you your bodies. it began eight million customers ago, and it continues every time one of our sleep professionals rejects the notion of the mass-produced human, and helps another person find their sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. save 50% on the final closeout of our silver plus special financing through new year's day. point." alina cho has a look at today's top stories. >> good morning ali and everybody. the outlook not so good, pennsylvania, new york, massachusetts, new hampshire, vermont and maine all under winter storm warnings. look at that radar there, all of that white across the country, up to 18 inches of snow or more expected to fall on parts of new england today. more than 1,700 flights had to be canceled just yesterday because of the weather, and more than 200 more today have already been canceled. >>> doctors say two firefighters shot on christmas eve are improving and now starting physical therapy. police say a gunman set fire as a trap, and then
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